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Switches and Hose - Splitrec 25 LP, CD and DL

DALE GORFINKEL

 

John Shand writes in the Sydney Morning Herald,

...he will open your ears to an improbable array of sound-as-music possibilities. The most radical piece is the title track, created with the help of a foot-pump, balloons and certain plumbing items. The Dadaist nature of that list is a clue to a keen sense of humour being at work amid the elements of surprise. Gong Cage has tonal colours that may more widely be considered "musical", but they interact in unconventional ways, while on another piece, Gorfinkel's use of modified vibraphones conjures the ethereality of a summer afternoon in Paradise. Enoggera (recorded outdoors at Brisbane's Enoggera Reservoir) has his modified trumpet blending with the bird and insect soundscape so completely that one could believe he (or perhaps his trumpet) had grown wings.

Joseph Cummins in The Music Trust writes,

Perhaps the highlight of the album is the Enoggera performance on modified trumpet, which is wreathed in a multitude of birdcalls that sit delightfully high in the mix. The dialogue that he performs with this terrestrial choir is a beautiful ending to a brief album showcasing the diverse talents of one of our most interesting sound makers.

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Truancy - Jim Denley and Cor Fuhler. splitrec 24 LP CD Download

John Shand writes in the Sydney Morning Herald

...these two improvised duets represent the art of spatial relationships, atmospherics and suspense. Nonetheless part of that suspense is derived from the sheer surprise factor of the sounds that unfold, sometimes even stretching to the delight of wondering on which instrument they were made!'.

Richard Pinnell in Wire says

"Never rushed, yet sustaining a feeling of confidence and comfort in their materials, Denley and Fuhler produce two sides of music here that at once cradle listeners in its comforting beauty while keeping them moving through ever changing scenery."

Brian Olewnick writing in Just Outside says

"...The music never gets frenetic, more going from medium to a nice, grainy, rough-edged, slow flow, the latter always full and grimy, with that wonderful sense of air circulating around the sounds.
An excellent recording, don't miss it.
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Massimo Ricci writes in Touching Extremes,

...my own positiveness for Truancy is a fact: deceivingly intelligible, it hides small doses of venom – of the sort that we at Touching Extremes love to savor."

Joseph Cummings writing in the Music Trust says,

"Five minutes into the first track Skive we hear a moment of radio, perhaps a song by the pop band Coldplay. Later we hear an advertisement. These sound bites lend a kind of mobility to the soundscape that, working in combination with the spectral range evoked by both players, gives the impression of satillites picking up transmissions from technologies as prosaic and domestic as radios, right through to the sound-waves broadcast by the earth-as-sound-machine. I can imagine more than just human ears appreciating the wide spectrum of sound on Truancy." ___________________________________________________________________________________________

Teletopa CoverTokyo 1972 - Teletopa splitrec CDX2 23 and limited edition of 300 LPX3 23 Buy the CDs or LPS. Samples of the group on soundcloud or buy the download as a 24bit hi res file.

"An alternative title for this extraordinary double album might have been The Shock of the Now. That an album of improvisation made 42 years ago can sound so blindingly new is a marvel, and a tribute to the artistry of the groundbreaking Sydney band... A remarkable aspect of the music-making is that the collective seems not to impose sounds on silence so much as pluck them from it. Daringly long pools of emptiness are gently ended by a gong, or shattered by sounds whose source can only be guessed at, sometimes involving such extremes of the sonic spectrum that you may fear for your speakers' integrity. This is a major document of improvisation." John Shand - Sydney Morning Herald.

Teletopa was founded in Sydney in 1970 by the late David Ahern with Peter Evans and Roger Frampton. (great article here on Ahern.)

Frans de Waard reviewing Tokyo 1972 in Vital.
"If AMM and MEV were already on your list, then this double CD by Teletopa should not be missed. An essential historical release."

"The suitably pure white album design, with a selection of black/white/grey photographs of the group, lend weight to the idea of the album as a once lost relic – the great manifesto of a mythical musical organism – now recovered for new generations to appreciate." Joseph Cummings.

"D'une certaine manière, on pourrait parler d'installation improvisée, ou plus simplement d'improvisation in situ au sens le plus littéral du terme. Que ce soit avec des instruments, des objets ou avec l'espace lui-même, Teletopa se propose, dans ces deux improvisations de cinquante minutes (les dernières avant la dissolution du groupe), d'improviser l'espace et l'environnement dans lequel il joue. L'espace résonne, les bruits se multiplient, l'environnement est transformé. Je n'ai rarement entendu d'improvisations aussi ancrées dans le présent, dans la spontanéité. Rien ne pouvait produire cette musique sinon là où elle avait lieu. Et de ce fait, jamais plus elle ne pourra se reproduire. Il y a quelque chose de magique, d'unique. Septembre 1972, NHK, Tokyo, Japon, les quatre membres de Teletopa ont à ce moment produit une performance sonore hors du commun, une performance longue, dure, bruitiste et brute, archaïque et austère, mais une performance présente, sans passé ni futur, une performance qui avait tout son sens à ce moment, qui n'en avait pas avant et qui n'en a plus aujourd'hui, sauf à travers le témoignage offert dans cet enregistrement. Un témoignage dont on se contentera et se délectera avec avidité et nostalgie. Car il est juste superbe" Julien Héraud.

http://olewnick.blogspot.com.au/2014/12/teletopa-tokyo-1972-splitrec-in-first.html

These projects have been assisted by the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts, its arts funding and advisory body.